Women in Construction Report - Building a better Workforce

We love this report based on a survey by Women in Property South West, Gapsquare and Rosemont Partnership about the demand for flexible working in the construction and property industries.

9 May 2018

Recruitment

The overwhelming majority of roles are still traditional full or part time (79.3%). Just 16% of respondents said their role was flexible. And yet flexibility was cited as the overwhelming attraction to a role, irrespective of age, sex or family circumstances. Qualitative feedback was that the profession is still very male dominated and that not enough is being done to market the industry dynamically, especially to the next generation. Recruitment is starting to address the need to get more women into the industry, but the pipeline is leaky, especially around the family years, for both women and men. Just 12% of women in managerial roles shows either promotion is an issue, or women haven’t been able to sustain their career following a break for children. Whilst there are female role models, there are far fewer women than men in management positions. We need to make women in the industry more visib

WIP

Diversity and Inclusion

While flexibility was cited as the overwhelming attraction to a role, irrespective of age, sex or family circumstances, only 16% of the respondents were in a flexible role at the time of the survey. A large majority indicate they had traditional full or part time roles (79.3%). The industry still very male dominated, and anecdotal evidence provided in the survey suggests not enough is being done to make the industry more dynamic and flexible, especially when marketing to the next generation. Data on recruitment shows that the process is becoming more focused on diversity and inclusion, and the sector is trying to attract more women. This is positive progress, but further analysis indicates this could be jeopardised by a leaky pipeline - especially around the family years - slow career progression for women, rigidity in employment practices and types of role. Of all of the female respondents, only 12% had managerial roles -indicating either overall slow career progression for women, or women haven’t been able to sustain their career following a break. Whilst there are female role models in the industry, there are far fewer women in management positions. This indicates that either the same women were role models for everybody, or that female role models were not necessarily in managerial roles. There was a big desire amongst respondents to make women in the industry more visible if it is to inspire the next generation.

WIP

See the full report and all their amazing infographics